Literature Index

Displaying 211 - 220 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    NOVEGIL SOUTO, José Vicente and DE SOUSA, Bruno C.
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    The Bologna educational reform taking place across Europe has reached Spain and Portugal. It places the student as the center of the entire process of teaching and learning, recognizing two main types of learning: presential and non-presential. With this in mind, the assessment methods need to be redefined and adapted to this new reality, where tutoring and learning must be integrated in the assessment process. This study takes place in two Introductory Statistics courses, one located in Vigo (Spain) and one in Guimarães (Portugal) and the results show an improvement in students' grades and also allow a more solid learning process achieved by the continuous nature of the method. Having the material virtual in Learning Management Systems (LMS) simplifies the work of the teacher and encourages the students to develop new study habits necessary for their success within the new reality of the Bologna reforms.
  • Author(s):
    Gordon, S.
    Year:
    1995
    Abstract:
    This paper provides examples of students' reflections on learning statistics. The Mathematics Learning Centre, where I teach, offers help to students experiencing difficulty with basic mathematics and statistics courses at the university. The excerpts are drawn from surveys or interviews of these and other students studying statistics at the University of Sydney. Activity theory, which is based on the work of Vygotsky, provides a helpful conceptual model for investigating learning at the university level. From the perspective of activity theory, learning is viewed as a mediated activity in a sociohistorical context. In particular, the way a student monitors and controls the ongoing cognitive activity depends on how that individual reflects on his or her efforts and evaluates success. In Semenov's words, " Thought must be seen as a cognitive activity that involves the whole person" (1978, p. 5). Students' interpretations of their learning tasks and the educational goals for their self-development are discussed within this theoretical framework.
  • Author(s):
    Mills, J. D.
    Year:
    2003
    Abstract:
    This article explores a theoretical framework to consider when teaching statistics. It is discussed and illustrated using one innovative approach to teaching using computer simulation methods. This framework can be considered across many different disciplines and age levels.
  • Author(s):
    Chanza, M. M., & Ocaya, R. O.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    In this age of information technology vast amounts of data are generated from many different processes which necessitate the practice of statistics in some form or other. Many third world students grapple with understanding the subject of Statistics and the success of teaching statistics depends on finding a satisfactory answer to many of the questions asked by the majority of students. This paper highlights the misconceptions that students have about statistics and shows that dispelling the myths and prejudices eases the teaching of the subject matter and the acceptance of statistics as a rewarding career.
  • Author(s):
    Kolev, N., & Paiva, D.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    We discuss our practice related to classical hypothesis testing about unknown parameters of a normal population offered to undergraduates in the University of São Paulo. We consider the tests for the population mean and variance when the sample size is "large" and "small" as well as the well-known tests comparing the means and variances for independent samples. We suggest an algorithmic approach, which our students appreciate
  • Author(s):
    Wiseman, F.
    Editors:
    Goodall, G.
    Year:
    2004
    Abstract:
    This article describes an example which is useful when teaching hypothesis testing in order to highlight the interrelationships that exist among the level of significance, the sample size and the statistical power of a test. The example also allows students to see how what they learn in the classroom directly affects the content of some of the commercials that they watch on television.
  • Author(s):
    J. B. Orris
    Year:
    2011
    Abstract:
    This paper shows how the variance and standard deviation can be represented graphically by looking at each squared deviation as a graphical object - in particular, as a square. A series of displays show how the standard deviation is the size of the average square.
  • Author(s):
    Tyrrell, S.
    Editors:
    Goodall, G.
    Year:
    2003
    Abstract:
    A bag of 24 packets of a well-known brand of crisps provides a handy visual (and edible) aid to looking at the syllabus of a basic course in statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Sungur, E. A., Winchester, B. S., Anderson, J. E., & Kim, J.-M.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    In this paper, we present a brief history of our efforts to incorporate civic learning into our statistics curriculum, highlighting our most recent approach, media reports. We discuss implementation issues, educational objectives, and give examples of student projects. Learning objectives, expected outcomes, and our assessment process are also given. An important aspect of this effort is the use of technology in report generation and dissemination. We discuss the development of these tools and how they have been used. We conclude with remarks on sustainability and possible future directions.
  • Author(s):
    Durran, J. H.
    Editors:
    Davidson, R., & Swift, J.
    Year:
    1986
    Abstract:
    Nowadays increasingly many people are admitting and increasingly many people are claiming to be Bayesians. We have heard a lot already at this conference about Bayesian statistics. Our pupils are going to read many texts by non-Bayesians and they need to learn how to interpret the various terms involved. The concepts and methods to which those terms refer are rooted in common-sense. This emerges, I believe, when they are exposed (rather than taught) in the way I adopt and that I want to share with you. I am asking you to participate in a speeded-up version of what would take several sessions with pupils.

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