Literature Index

Displaying 191 - 200 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Kader, G. & Perry, M.
    Editors:
    Phillips, B.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    This paper will describe a content-pedagogy course designed to prepare elementary and middle school teachers to teach statistics in the schools. The course is organized around the newly revised content standards developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. A central objective is to encourage teachers to see statistics as a problem solving process. The course has been implemented as one component of the "Learning Math" Project. Produced by WGBH with funding from the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting Math and Science Project, "Learning Math" is developing a series of five college-level courses designed to teach mathematics content to elementary and middle schools teachers. In the statistics course, nine video sessions follow an actual class of teachers through content classes, with footage edited to highlight critical statistical concepts. An on-line course, which parallels the nine videos, is also being developed.
  • Author(s):
    Michael Bedwell
    Year:
    2009
    Abstract:
    This article argues that the Normal distribution is often not a good model for anthropomorphic data.
  • Author(s):
    Kraemer, H. C.
    Year:
    1985
    Abstract:
    A method is suggested to incorporate instruction in the concept and the application of power considerations into an applied statistics course. This is based on designing one table usable for a wide range of the type of statistical tests usually introduced in such a course.
  • Author(s):
    Goldsmith, T. E., & Johnson, P. J.
    Editors:
    Schvaneveldt, R. W.
    Year:
    1990
    Abstract:
    A most basic and long standing conern of philosophers, psychologists, and educators is the probblem of knowledge elicitiation and represntation. How do we assess and represent an individual's knoledge? Philosophers, when asking these questions, have usually expressed an interest in general or world knowledge. Pschologists and educators, on the other hand, have often been more internerestedin the problem of assessing and representing a person's knowledge of some particular topic or area. It is this problem , as it arises in the assessment of classroom types of knoledge, that is the concern of the present chapter. Knowledge assessmetn and representation, as carried out in the classroom, appears as a relatively straghtforward matter. Knowledge is assessed by simply asking factual questions and is represented by presenting the indicidual's relatice standing in terms of a percentile. We begin with a critique of this conventional approach to assessing and representing classroom knowledge.
    Location:
  • Author(s):
    Dirk T. Tempelaar, Sybrand Schim van der Loeff, and Wim Gijselaers
    Editors:
    Iddo Gal<br>Tom Short
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    Recent research in statistical reasoning has focused on the developmental process in students when learning statistical reasoning skills. This study investigates statistical reasoning from the perspective of individual differences. As manifestation of heterogeneity, students' prior attitudes toward statistics, measured by the extended Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics (SATS), are used (Schau, Stevens, Dauphinee &amp; DeVecchio, 1995). Students' statistical reasoning abilities are identified by the Statistical Reasoning Assessment (SRA) instrument (Garfield 1996, 1998a, 2003). The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between attitudes and reasoning abilities by estimating a full structural equation model. Instructional implications of the model for the teaching of statistical reasoning are discussed.
  • Author(s):
    Tempelaar, D.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., &amp; Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    Recent research in statistical reasoning has focused on the developmental process in students when learning statistical reasoning skills. This study investigates statistical reasoning from the perspective of individual differences. As manifestation of heterogeneity, students' prior attitudes toward statistics, measured by the extended Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics (SATS: Schau, Stevens, Dauphinee and DeVecchio, 1995), and students' learning approaches, measured by the Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS; Vermunt, 2005) are used. Students' statistical reasoning abilities are identified by the Statistical Reasoning Assessment instrument (SRA; Garfield 1998, 2003). The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between both attitudes and learning approaches versus reasoning abilities by estimating full structural equation models. Instructional implications of the models for the teaching of statistical reasoning are discussed.
  • Author(s):
    Dor Abrahamson
    Year:
    2009
    Abstract:
    What instructional materials and practices will help students make sense of probability<br>notions? Li (11 years) participated in an interview-based implementation of a design for the binomial. The<br>design was centered around an innovative urn-like random generator, creating opportunities to reconcile two<br>mental constructions of anticipated outcome distributions: (a) holistic perceptual judgments based in tacit<br>knowledge of population-to-sample relations and implicitly couched in terms of the aggregate events with no<br>attention to permutations on these combinations; and (b) classicist-probability analytic treatment of ratios<br>between the subset of favorable to all elemental events with attention to the permutations. We argue that<br>constructivist and sociocultural perspectives on mathematics learning can be reconciled by revealing<br>interactions of intuitive and formal resources in individual development of deep conceptual understanding.<br>Learning is the guided process of blending two constructions of problematized situations: the<br>phenomenologically immediate and the semiotically mediated.
  • Author(s):
    Utts, J., Sommer, B., Acredolo, C., Maher, M. W., &amp; Matthews, H. R.
    Year:
    2003
    Abstract:
    Advances in technology coupled with increasing student enrollment numbers have led some universities to begin offering on-line classes. This paper discusses a study comparing a traditional offering of elementary statistics with a "hybrid" offering. In the hybrid offering the class met once a week, but students were required to learn the material on their own using web-based materials and a textbook. We examined differences in student performance, student satisfaction and investment of both student and instructor time. Performance of students in the hybrid offering equaled that of the traditional students, but students in the hybrid were slightly less positive in their subjective evaluation of the course.
  • Author(s):
    NABBOUT, Marie
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    In this paper we present part of a study carried out to identify Lebanese teachers' representations of probability as well as their teaching practices. We compare grades and judgments that teachers attribute to fictitious students. Our result show inconsistencies in grading on the same teacher: discrepancy between the quantitative judgment (grade) and the qualitative judgment that he attributes to the same answer. The comparison between the quantitative judgments (grades) and the qualitative judgments reveals a great diversity among teachers: a convergence in grading can hide very different qualitative judgments. This comparison contributed largely to the study of certain representations and practices of teachers, in particular those concerning the concept of independence of events.
  • Author(s):
    Kirsten Doehler, Laura Taylor, and Jessalyn Smith
    Year:
    2013
    Abstract:
    The purpose of this research is to better understand the role of statistics in teaching and research by faculty from all disciplines and their perceptions of the statistical preparation of their students. This study reports the findings of a survey administered to faculty from seven colleges and universities regarding the use of statistics in teaching and research with undergraduate students. The introductory statistics course serves as a foundation for statistical methods that students learn and use in classes within numerous other disciplines. Information was collected from faculty on how students can be better prepared in the introductory statistics class to use statistics in other disciplines. Findings from this paper imply that statistics is being widely used in a variety of disciplines but also suggest that cooperative communication and transitional second courses in statistics be implemented. This paper also highlights the varied statistical techniques that faculty members teach in their courses and mentor in student research projects and statistical experiences.

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