Literature Index

Displaying 181 - 190 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Cao, R.
    Editors:
    Phillips, B.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    Some ideas about how basic aspects of nonparametric curve estimation can be introduced to students at a post secondary level will be discussed here. The idea of estimating population curves, like the density or the regression function, is studied from a nonparametric viewpoint. Starting from well-known estimators as the histogram or the regressogram, the discussion will then go to some of the smoothing methods developed in the last four decades, mainly focusing on the kernel density and regression estimators. Some ideas about the important problem of smoothing parameter selection will also be presented.
  • Author(s):
    Batanero, J. C., Godino, J. D., Steiner, H.-G., & Wenzelburger, E.
    Year:
    1993
    Abstract:
    In this report we present the results of an international research study on the training of researchers in mathematics education. The study was carried out by some members of The International Study Group on Theory of Mathematics Education.<br><br>The research consisted of developing a questionnaire which was mailed to numerous institutions all over the world, and the anlaysis of the answers which were received.<br><br>The main objective of the study was to collect international data about the training of researchers in mathematics education and to establish an information network about graduate programs in the field.<br><br>A total of about 150 questionnaires were sent out and 78 answers received. Fifteen of these answers came from universities that wish to participate in the network but which do not at present have a program.
    Location:
  • Author(s):
    Roger W. Johnson
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    Our pig game involves a series of tosses of a die with the possibility of a player's score improving with each additional toss. With each additional toss, however, there is also the chance of losing the entire score accumulated so far. Two different strategies for deciding how many tosses a player should attempt are developed and then compared in terms of expected score.
  • Author(s):
    Dunn, P. K.
    Year:
    1999
    Abstract:
    The baby boom dataset contains the time of birth, sex, and birth weight for 44 babies born in one 24-hour period at a hospital in Brisbane, Australia. The data can be used to demonstrate that some common distributions -- the normal, binomial, geometric, Poisson, and exponential -- can be used to model real situations. Because the dataset is small and easily understood, it provides a useful classroom example for discussing these distributions.
  • Author(s):
    Rickey E. Carter
    Year:
    2010
    Abstract:
    Statistical adjustments to accommodate multiple comparisons are routinely covered in introductory statistical courses. The fundamental rationale for such adjustments, however, may not be readily understood. This article presents a simple illustration to help remedy this
  • Author(s):
    Weldon, K. L.
    Year:
    2000
    Abstract:
    The simplest forms of regression and correlation involve formulas that are incomprehensible to many beginning students. The application of these techniques is also often misunderstood. The simplest and most useful description of the techniques involves the use of standardized variables, the root mean square operation, and certain distance measures between points and lines. On the standardized scale, the simple linear regression coefficient equals the correlation coefficient, and the distinction between fitting a line to points and choosing a line for prediction is made transparent. The typical size of prediction errors is estimated in a natural way by summarizing the actual prediction errors incurred in the dataset by use of the regression line for prediction. The connection between correlation and distance is simplified. Despite their intuitive appeal, few textbooks make use of these simplifications in introducing correlation and regression.
  • Author(s):
    David Martin
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    This note presents a spreadsheet tool that allows teachers the opportunity to guide students towards answering on their own questions related to the multiple regression F-test, the t-tests, and multicollinearity. The note demonstrates approaches for using the spreadsheet that might be appropriate for three different levels of statistics classes, so teachers can select the context that is most appropriate for their particular needs. The spreadsheet tool is linked to this article, and materials are provided in the appendices for teachers to use as handouts, homework questions, and answer keys.
  • Author(s):
    Romeu, J. L., &amp; Alemzadeh, J.
    Year:
    1999
    Abstract:
    During the Spring of 1995 a statistical experiment to assess the effects of two methods of teaching introduction to Computer programming concepts was developed. The experiment implemented two teaching approaches: traditional lecture vs. laboratory (tehcnology). Several performance measures were defined and then collected throughout the course, to assess student learning. Among them are: results from common tests, quizzes, and homework/projects. In this article we assess the effects of these two teaching approaches on students' learning, retention, and success rates. We analyze statistically the data collected, testing several hypotheses based on our teaching experience. Finally, we give several conclusions drawn on the analyses results.
  • Author(s):
    Kranendonk, H., &amp; Peck, R.
    Editors:
    Burrill, G. F.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    This article describes the project "A Statistical Study of Generations" that attempts to engage high school students and also teach sound mathematical and statistical reasoning. Some evidence is presented that students' were disposed to view mathematics as "sensible, useful, and doable".
  • Author(s):
    Holmes, P.
    Editors:
    Davidson, R., &amp; Swift, J.
    Year:
    1986
    Abstract:
    In England and Wales all pupils take major examinations at the age of 16. Until recently these were either the General Certificate of Education (GCE) for the more-able pupils and the Certificate of Secondary Education (CSE) for those not taking the GCE. As from courses starting this year there will be only one set of examinations, the GCSE, which are aimed at pupils of all abilities. Whilst combining the two systems the opportunity has been taken to rethink all the syllabuses and the purposes for which they are devised. This rethinking shows in published national criteria. All syllabuses have to conform to general criteria, many individual syllabuses have their own extra subject specific criteria (but statistics is not one of these).

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