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Webinars

  • Primarily Statistics: Developing an Introductory Statistics Course for Pre-service Elementary Teachers

    Jennifer L. Green, Montana State University and Erin E. Blankenship, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 3:30pm
    We developed an introductory statistics course for pre-service elementary teachers. In this webinar, we will describe the goals and structure of the course, as well as the assessments we implemented. Overall, the course aims to help pre-service teachers recognize the importance of statistics in the elementary curriculum, as well as the integral role they, as teachers, can play in a student's entire statistical education.
  • Does My Baby Really Look Like Me? Using Tests for Resemblance to Teach Topics in Categorical Data Analysis

    Amy G. Froelich & Dan Nettleton, Iowa State University
    Tuesday, November 19, 2013 - 12:00pm
    Many new parents have heard claims of a striking resemblance between them and their babies. As parents ourselves, we were skeptical of such claims so we devised a study to objectively answer the question "Does my baby really look like me?" In this webinar, we will present a study to test whether neutral observers perceive a resemblance between a parent and a child. We will demonstrate the general approach with two parent/child pairs (Amy and her daughter and Dan and his son) using survey data collected from introductory statistics students serving as neutral observers. We will then present ideas for incorporating the study design process, data collection, and analysis into different statistics courses.
  • The "Core Concepts Plus" Paradigm for Creating an Electronic Textbook for Introductory Business and Economic Statistics

    M. Ryan Haley, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
    Monday, November 18, 2013 - 12:00pm
    This paper describes a textbook -development paradigm that has the flexibility to meet the specific needs of a department, college, and surrounding business community, while simultaneously lowering costs for students, facilitating the transition from intro-level to mid- and upper-level courses, preserving professor-specific preferences over course content and structure, increasing the quality and uniformity of the curriculum, overcoming difficulties of traditional rental programs, enhancing the professional development and teaching ability of professors, and improving student learning outcomes.
  • Distinguishing Between Binomial, Hypergeometric, and Negative Binomial Distributions

    Jacqueline Wroughton, Northern Kentucky University
    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 12:00pm
    In this webinar I will discuss the development and assessment of an activity used in an introductory calculus-based statistics course to distinguish between these three discrete distributions. Students from the assessment were students in one of these courses.
  • Using fun in the statistics classroom: An exploratory study of college instructors' hesitations and motivations

    Lawrence Lesser, The University of Texas at El Paso; Rob Carver, Stonehill College; and Patricia Erickson, Taylor University; on behalf of the paper's 11-author team
    Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 12:00pm
    In this webinar, we discuss the rationale and results for an exploratory survey on (N = 249) statistics instructors' use of fun, including their motivations, hesitations, and awareness of resources. Respondents were attendees at the 2011 United States Conference on Teaching Statistics and 16 completed phone interviews after the conference.
  • A Study of Faculty Views of Statistics and Student Preparation Beyond an Introductory Class

    Kirsten Doehler & Laura Taylor; Elon University
    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 12:00pm
    Our presentation will highlight the needs in statistics education from the perspective of client disciplines based on the use of statistics in teaching and research in various academic affiliations. This information will cultivate discussion on how to use the information to guide curriculum development in introductory statistics. As a result of this study, a large data set was compiled that can be used in the classroom for students to explore. A demonstration of how to access and use the data set in class will be given.
  • Teaching Principles of One-Way Analysis of Variance Using M&M's Candy; The Cleveland Clinic Statistical Education Dataset Repository: Examples and more Examples

    Todd Schwartz, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm
    Teaching Principles of One-Way Analysis of Variance Using M&M's Candy I present an active learning classroom exercise illustrating essential principles of one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods. The exercise is easily conducted by the instructor and is instructive (as well as enjoyable) for the students. This is conducive for demonstrating many theoretical and practical issues related to ANOVA and lends itself to multiple possible configurations of ANOVA results, leading to rich classroom discussion and deeper student understanding of real-world applications of the methods. The Cleveland Clinic Statistical Education Dataset Repository: Examples and more Examples Examples are highly sought by both students and teachers. This is particularly true as many statistical instructors aim to engage their students and increase active participation. While simulated datasets are functional, they lack real perspective and the intricacies of actual data. Described is the creation of a new web-based statistical educational resource. This growing dataset repository presents raw data from real medical studies and offers (a) a vignette summarizing the study, research question and study design; (b) a data dictionary with clear documentation of variables and codes; (c) a complete citation for the associated study publication; and (d) a variety of data formats compatible with the majority of statistical packages.

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