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  • In the Latin Square computational pages on this site, the third IV, with levels designated as A, B, C, etc., is listed as the "treatment" variable. The analysis of variance within an orthogonal Latin Square results in three F-ratios: one for the row variable, one for the column variable, and one for the third IV whose j levels are distributed orthogonally among the cells of the rows x columns matrix.

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  • This page has two calculators. One will cacluate a simple logistic regression, while the other calculates the predicted probability and odds ratio. There is also a brief tutorial covering logistic regression using an example involving infant gestational age and breast feeding. Please note, however, that the logistic regression accomplished by this page is based on a simple, plain-vanilla empirical regression.

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  • This page will calculate the intercorrelations (r and r2) for up to five variables, designated as A, B, C, D, and E.

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  • This page will calculate the intercorrelations (r) for any number of variables (V1, V2, V3, etc.) and for any number of observations per variable.

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  • This resource defines what a p-value is, why .05 is significant, and when to use it. It also covers related topics such as one-tailed/two-tailed tests and hypothesis testing.
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  • This resource defines a pie chart. It also allows the user to input values to create their own graphs. The user has control over the title, up to 15 slices, the color of each slice, and can choose a 3-D option.

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  • The applet in this section allows for simple data analysis of univariate data. Users can either generate normal or uniform data for k samples or copy and paste data from another source to a text box. A univariate analysis is performed for all k samples. A two-sample t-test (Pooled and Satterthwaite) is performed for k = 2. An ANOVA test is performed for k > 2. This page was formerly located at http://www.stat.vt.edu/~sundar/java/applets/Data.html
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  • In this activity, students work in groups to provide practical interpretations of graphs, considering shape, center, and spread. Each group posts their interpretation for one graph and critiques other groups' interpretations on other graphs. Students examine key aspects (shape, spread, location, etc) of histograms and stem plots to develop the ability to interpret graphics. This activity gets the students up and out of their seats and working together. It is a good activity for early in a term. The Gallery Walk idea can be adapted for different sized classes but this activity has been designed for classes up to 65 students.
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  • The applets in this section of Statistical Java address Power. Users can perform one or two tailed tests for proportions or means for one or two samples. Set the parameters and drag the mouse across the graph to see how effect size affects power. An article and an alternative source for this applet can be found at http://www.amstat.org/publications/jse/v11n3/java/power/ This page was formerly located at http://www.stat.vt.edu/~sundar/java/applets/Power.html
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  • The applets in this section of Statistical Java allow you to see how levels of confidence are achieved through repeated sampling. The confidence intervals are related to the probability of successes in a Binomial experiment. The main page gives the equation for finding confidence intervals and describes the parameters (p, n, alpha). Each applet allows you to change a different parameter and simulate sampling to demonstrate the long run proportion of intervals that contain the true probability of success. The applets are available from a pull-down menu at the bottom of the page. This page was formerly located at http://www.stat.vt.edu/~sundar/java/applets/CI.html
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